The New York Times The New York Times International November 2, 2002  

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Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Loses Momentum

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

NEW DELHI, Nov. 1 An international conference on climate change concluded here today with the adoption of a declaration that sidestepped any future commitments by developing countries to curb the emission of the gases that cause global warming.

Within a decade, countries like China, Mexico and India are collectively predicted to surpass industrial nations in their releases of these gases. But climate agreements so far have exempted the poorer countries from obligations to reduce the release of greenhouse gases.

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After two days and a night of negotiations, the wording was a victory for the developing countries, which fought hard to ensure that the declaration did not include any possible future measures they might have to abide by. The European Union, by contrast, had pushed for language on future reductions in the production of greenhouse gases.

In essence, the final document, the Delhi Ministerial Declaration on Climate Change and Sustainable Development, says each poor country should develop its own "appropriate" strategy to reduce emissions according to its own capacity, rather than being bound by an international consensus. In the meantime, the declaration said, the focus should be on adapting to climate change as much as trying to prevent it.

Building on principles laid down in Johannesburg in August at the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development, the declaration reiterated that economic and social development and the eradication of poverty are the priorities of developing countries.





PRESIDENT PRESSES ASIANS AT SUMMIT ON FISCAL TURMOIL  (November 25, 1997)  $

Clinton Urges Action on Global Warming  (May 10, 1997)  $

U.S. to Back Scientist From India To Replace Global Warming Expert  (April 3, 2002)  $

Bush Offers Plan for Voluntary Measures to Limit Gas Emissions  (February 15, 2002)  $



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